FLY FISHING HOME DECOR : FLY FISHING


Fly Fishing Home Decor : Pictures For Wall Decor.



Fly Fishing Home Decor





fly fishing home decor






    fly fishing
  • The sport of fishing using a rod and an artificial fly as bait

  • angling with an artificial fly as a lure

  • The Contemplative Man's Recreation (Izaak Walton), fly fishing is an ancient angling method to catch fish with artificial lures as distinct from live or dead bait. Casting the (practically) weightless lure requires a special fishing line and a long rod.

  • A technique for fishing where the weight of the line is used to cast a very light weight fly that would not be heavy enough to be cast with a conventional spinning or casting rod.





    home decor
  • The design, furnishing and decorating of the home or apartment; the products used to decorate a home.

  • Interior design is a multi-faceted profession in which creative and technical solutions are applied within a structure to achieve a built interior environment.

  • any decorative items that make your house or garden feel like your home – often available in themes and groupings











Battersea Power Station




Battersea Power Station





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Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames, in Battersea, South London. The station comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built first in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II* listed. The station's celebrity owes to numerous cultural appearances, which include a shot in The Beatles' 1965 movie Help! and being used in the cover art of Pink Floyd's 1977 album Animals.
Since closure the site has remained largely unused, with numerous failed redevelopment plans from successive site owners. The site is currently owned by Irish company Real Estate Opportunities, who purchased it for ?400 million in November 2006. The station is the largest brick building in Europe and is notable for its original, lavish Art Deco interior fittings and decor. However, the building's condition has been described as "very bad" by English Heritage, who include the power station on its Buildings at Risk Register. In 2004 the power station was on the World Monuments Fund's List of 100 Most Endangered Sites.
History
Until the late 1930s electricity was supplied by municipal undertakings. These were small power companies that built power stations dedicated to a single industry or group of factories, and sold any excess electricity to the public. These companies used widely differing standards of voltage and frequency. In 1925, parliament decided that the power grid should be a single system with uniform standards under public ownership. Several of the private power companies reacted to the proposal by forming the London Power Company. They planned to heed parliament's recommendations and build a small number of very large stations.
The London Power Company's first of these super power stations was planned for the Battersea area, on the south bank of the River Thames in London. The proposal for the station was made in 1927, for a station built in two stages, capable of generating 400,000 kilowatts (kW) of electricity once completed. The site chosen for the construction of the station was a 15 acre plot of land which had been the site of the reservoirs for the former Southwark and Vauxhall Waterworks Company. The site was chosen for its close proximity to the River Thames for cooling water and coal delivery, and because it was sited in the heart of London, the station's immediate supply area.
The proposal sparked protests from those who felt that the building would be too large and would be an eyesore, as well as worries about the pollution damaging local buildings, parks and even paintings in the nearby Tate Gallery. The company addressed the former concern by hiring Sir Giles Gilbert Scott to design the building's exterior. He was a noted architect and industrial designer, famous for his design of the red telephone box, and of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. He would go on to design another London power station, Bankside, which now houses the Tate Modern art gallery. The pollution issue was resolved by granting permission for the station on the condition that its emissions were to be treated, to ensure they were cleaner and contained less smoke.
Construction of the first phase, the A Station, commenced in March 1929. The main building work was carried out by John Mowlem & Co, and the structural steelwork erection carried out by Sir William Arrol & Co. Other contractors were employed for specialist tasks. Most of the electrical equipment, including the steam turbine turbo generators, was produced by Metropolitan Vickers. The building of the steel frame began in October 1930. Once completed, the construction of the brick cladding began, in March 1931. Prior to the construction of the B Station, the eastern wall of the boiler house was clad in corrugated metal sheeting as a temporary enclosure. The A Station first generated electricity in 1933, but was not completed until 1935. The total cost of its construction came to ?2,141,550. Between construction beginning, in 1929, and 1933 there were 6 fatal and 121 non-fatal accidents on the site.
A short number of months after the end of Second World War, construction commenced on the second phase, the B Station. The station came into operation gradually between 1953 to 1955. It was identical to the A Station from the outside and was constructed directly to its east as a mirror to it, which gave the power station its now familiar four-chimney layout. The construction of the B Station brought the site's generating capacity up to 509 megawatts (MW), making it the third largest generating site in the UK at the time, providi











Green Moth Urania leilus in a Black Frame for Home Decor




Green Moth Urania leilus in a Black Frame for Home Decor





This is the green swallowtail butterfly lookin species is in fact the Urania leilus moth. The Urania leilus was first described by Linnaeus in 1758 and belongs to the Uraniidae family. A day flying moth that commonly migrates along river streams and can be found on riverbeds basking alongside many other species. This brilliant species if often mistaken for a green butterfly, a green swallowtail to be more specific.

ALWAYS FREE SHIPPING IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S.

4.5" x 5.5" Black frame with double pane glass front and back (see through)

*All frames are hand crafted and the quality and characteristics are much better then the common, one-sided Riker Mounts. One of the great benefits of double pane glass framing is that you can see the front and back sides of the mounted butterflies. In most cases involving Neotropical butterflies the front and back sides of the wings are distinctly different. The back many times displays a species distinct form of self defense.*

Every butterfly from Ben the Butterfly Guy comes from butterfly farms throughout the Eastern region of Peru. All butterflies here are classified non-endangered by the international CITES listings as reviewed by both the Ministry of Agriculture from Peru and U.S. Fish and Wildlife in the States. Copies of documentation and clearance are available upon request for your assurance and peace of mind.









fly fishing home decor







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